Technology, ICT & Telecom Blog Computer Training, Video Surveillance & CCTV Info, Telephone Systems


PLACE YOUR ADVERTS HERE
PLACE YOUR ADVERTS HERE

Should you choose IP or analogue CCTV for your home security?

xhoosing between analogue and ip cctv

Security has become a major concern in homes and businesses making CCTV a paramount installation to fit into every home and business security plan.
For those who know a bit about video surveillance systems, users normally have to make a decision as to which system they want to install as their security solution.
Technically speaking, there is the conventional analogue CCTV system in one hand and the IP systems. From the financial point of view, the analogue system is likely to be more cost effective the IP counterpart although the cost of IP cameras and NVR are declining due to technology and competition.

In this post, we are going to highlight the technical features of both solutions – Analogue and IP CCTV systems.

In the traditional analog CCTV application, security cameras capture an analog video signal and transfer that signal over coax cable to the Digital Video Recorder (DVR). Each camera may be powered by plugging in the power supply right at the camera or by using RG59 Siamese cable which bundles the video and the power cables. The DVR converts the analog signal to digital, compresses it, and then stores it on a hard drive for later retrieval. Intelligence is built into the DVR to handle such things as scheduling, motion detection, and digital zoom. Monitors for viewing the video are connected to the DVR, or it can be set up to publish over an internal network for viewing on PCs. The DVR can also be set up to broadcast over the Internet and can add password protection and other features. When broadcasting over the Internet, the video for all of the cameras is transmitted as one stream (one IP address). Therefore, it is very efficient.



In the IP world, each network camera captures an analog image but immediately converts it to digital inside the camera. Some digital processing can happen right at the camera, such as compression and motion detection. The digital video stream is then broadcast over the local area network (LAN) using Ethernet (CAT5 or CAT6) cable. Power is supplied to the cameras through the ethernet cable via Power-Over-Ethernet (POE) adapters built into the cameras and at the (POE enabled) switch. (FYI – Older style IP cameras do not have POE built in so POE adapters had be added to the system like this.) The ethernet cable for each camera is plugged into the switch which feeds into the network hub. As with all network devices, some set-up needs to be done for each network camera to set up its IP address and other identifying attributes.

A Network Video Recorder (NVR) performs the same function as its DVR cousin in the analog world. It captures each camera’s signal, compresses, and records it. The main difference is that the video feeds are digital (and much higher resolution) and not analog. Software built into the NVR provides features such as intelligent search and zoom, etc. The NVR combines the video streams from the cameras and handles the broadcast over the LAN and internet for local and remote viewing.
Wireless Security Camera System Design

IP Wireless security camera system design is very similar to standard IP camera system design except for the addition of wireless access points inserted between the home network switch and the cameras. This allows you to place cameras up to 1.5 miles (plus up to 328 feet of Ethernet cable) away from your local area network (LAN).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *